Adult video chat c2c - Newspaper dating abbreviations

The general reason for this is convenience and succinctness for specialists, although it has led some to obfuscate the meaning either intentionally, to deter those without such domain-specific knowledge, or unintentionally, by creating an acronym that already existed.

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Some well-known commercial examples dating from the 1890s through 1920s include Nabisco (National Biscuit Company), Esso (from S. Roosevelt (also of course known as FDR) under the New Deal.

O., from Standard Oil), and Sunoco (Sun Oil Company). Business and industry also are prolific coiners of acronyms. Navy, is COMCRUDESPAC, which stands for commander, cruisers destroyers Pacific; it's also seen as "Com Cru Des Pac".

In English and most other languages, such abbreviations historically had limited use, but they became much more common in the 20th century.

Acronyms are a type of word formation process, and they are viewed as a subtype of blending.

Another driver for the adoption of acronyms was modern warfare with its many highly technical terms. The rapid advance of science and technology in recent centuries seems to be an underlying force driving the usage, as new inventions and concepts with multiword names create a demand for shorter, more manageable names. "YABA-compatible" (where YABA stands for "yet another bloody acronym") is used to mean that a term's acronym can be pronounced but is not an offensive word, e.g., "When choosing a new name, be sure it is 'YABA-compatible'." Acronym use has been further popularized by text messaging on mobile phones with Short Message Systems (SMS).

While there is no recorded use of military acronyms in documents dating from the American Civil War (acronyms such as ANV for "Army of Northern Virginia" post-date the war itself), they had become somewhat common in World War I and were very much a part even of the vernacular language of the soldiers during World War II, who themselves were referred to as G. The widespread, frequent use of acronyms across the whole range of registers is a relatively new linguistic phenomenon in most languages, becoming increasingly evident since the mid-20th century. To fit messages into the 160-character SMS limit, acronyms such as "GF" (girlfriend), "LOL" (laughing out loud), and "DL" (download or down low) have become popular.

Larry Trask, American author of The Penguin Guide to Punctuation, states categorically that, in British English, "this tiresome and unnecessary practice is now obsolete".

Nevertheless, some influential style guides, many of them American, still require periods in certain instances. The logic of this style is that the pronunciation is reflected graphically by the punctuation scheme.

is available.) The second reason for the key feature is its pedagogical value in educational works such as textbooks.

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